“Let Them Learn From Failure”: Does it Apply When Parenting Our Adult Kids?

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Wait, so you can’t insist that your adult “child” do what he/she doesn’t want to do?

All joking aside, this question has been an ongoing life lesson for me – and also a much discussed topic among my friends who also have adult “kids” (italicized because while they are no longer little children, we are still their perennial parents.)

What can we do if we think our adult “kid” is about to fail?

It is our strongest instinct as parents to rescue our children.  But we shouldn’t always do so, says author and teacher, Jessica Lahey in her recent, thoughtful book “The Gift of Failure”. Parents of growing children do them no favors by scooping them up on the playground of life to save them from every slip and fall. When our children are young, Lahey explains, they learn from failure so we must let them experience it, rather than always rushing in to protect them from its’ consequences.

(a concept I well knew in theory, but then again years ago when my high school son left his biology textbook in his locker at school that evening before a big exam…)

But what happens when our growing children are all grown up?

If our young child falls off of a playground slide, his scraped knee heals. If our teenager doesn’t get accepted into the college of his choice, likely he will do fine at another school.

But if we think our adult son is about to enter a disastrous marriage, our adult daughter is in a relationship harmful to her mental health or our son’s partying ways are spinning out of control, the stakes are much higher, aren’t they?

Lately my friends and I have been sharing our worries about our adult “kids.”

  • My friend L.’s 30-year-old daughter struggles in a tumultuous  relationship with an unkind man. Upset and crying, the daughter calls L. and says that despite how he acts, she really loves him and can’t part ways. Can’t she see, L. wonders, that she is hurting herself by staying with him?

 

  • The 26-year-old son of my friend H. recently began his first post-grad school job at a big financial firm. He’s always been a model kid, dutiful, well-behaved but suddenly (?) has started to go out to bars with friends every night, partying till the wee hours and arriving late at work. He just received a warning notice from his boss. Can’t he see, H. thinks, that he is messing up at a critical time?

 

  • C.’s  29-year-old son brought his girlfriend home to meet C. and her husband.  The girlfriend’s strongly controlling manner upsets C., as does her son’s changed behavior. She thinks her son is about to announce his engagement. Should she tell her son she thinks that marriage to this woman would be a mistake?

Do parents of adult “kids” always know best?

Parents believe that we have clear (yet hardly objective) vision with our kids’ best interests in mind. That our kids are the ones with the big blind spots that prevent them from recognizing bad choices.  Surely, if we point out to our adult “kids” what we know to be true – they will promptly turn to us and gratefully say, thanks, Mom and Dad  – you are so right, I was so wrong. I will do exactly what you say and change my life!

Not happening.

If I ever tried that, my adult kids would dismiss me as intrusive, give me the silent treatment or get angry and the carefully nurtured bonds of Parent/Adult “Kid” communication would greatly fray.

Does the “let them learn from their failures” concept apply even when our adult “kid” is poised to make a major life mistake with possibly painful consequences?

My carefully thought out answer? And honestly, I am not waffling here. But both Yes and No.

Yes:  While they are adults, we are their perennial parents, and with great delicacy and respect, we still can tell our adult kids how we feel.

AND

No, we shouldn’t tell them what to do.

Telling them how we feel  – versus – telling them what to do = a BIG difference.

I’m not writing an advice column here (but hey, wouldn’t that be a great job to have? Kind of like my lawyer job where I gave advice to clients for many years, but their questions were far less fun. Not that my clients weren’t fun. They were. But legal issues, not so much. I digress.)

My friend with the daughter in the struggling relationship could tell her the next time she calls:

“It makes me sad when you tell me Boyfriend says such nasty things to you.”

For the son whose job may be on the line:

“I worry about your health when you talk about going out and drinking every night during the work week.”

The controlling serious Girlfriend?

“Son, it made me very uncomfortable listening to how Girlfriend talks to you during your last visit home.”

Assuming we can limit our remarks to how we feel – a major assumption that – might our parental comments prod our adult kids to think things through and start on different paths?

Or not.

As Jessica Lahey said, failure teaches a lesson. It breeds resiliency. Second chances. Growth.

Marriages don’t always work out. Young adults lose jobs. Mental health can worsen and then improve. Even when the stakes are so high, do we owe our adult “kids”, not just the littler ones, the right to make their own mistakes and learn from them?

It’s complicated.

 

 

9 Comments

Filed under 1st Job, Adult Kids, Baby Boomers, Communications, daughters, Empty Nest, Family, friendship, Letting Go, Parenting, Raising Kids, Relationships, Sons, Women

9 responses to ““Let Them Learn From Failure”: Does it Apply When Parenting Our Adult Kids?

  1. Cbbttfld@aol.com

    Thank you for writing this post. I have 27 year old daughter and 25 year old son. Your article is spot on

    Like

  2. Miriam Daniel

    Nice!

    Like

  3. Marcia

    Oh, Nancy, you’ve done it again! I have two boys aged 23 and 25. Both have dealt with addiction and both have been in rehab. It’s all I can do to keep my mouth shut sometimes!
    I usually give them my two cents as a “mother’s privilege” and then back off. It’s tough watching them make some of these choices and I can only hope that “this will be the one” that helps them to see the light.
    Thanks again for another spot-on post that helps me to remember I’m not alone.

    Like

  4. If only I can keep you counsel in mind before I open my mouth with advice for my adult “kids”. The road to hell is paved with the best of intentions. How true! Thanks!,

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  5. Janel

    So true Nancy. Parenting this age group is is knowing when to step forward and when to step back. I enjoy your blog

    Like

  6. It is a very tough question, situation,reality.
    I just mentioned that our dining room table seats 8 beautifully not 9 for Thanksgiving. Not sure my comment sunk in to anyone. Subtly voiced remarks seem to fall on deaf ears!

    Like

  7. I’ve also found it helps to pick my battles with my adult daughter. I seldom weigh in and when I do, it’s probably still too often as far as she’s concerned. But she’s far more likely to listen to me than her nagging stepmother. Or grandmother.

    Like

  8. Karen

    Just read your article in my local paper . Loved it! I am having anxiety over my 21 year old daughter who wants to sleep at boyfriends. She’s in her last year of college, so she’ll then be home indefinitely. I disapprove! I told her while she’ s living at home she needs to sleep at home. Am I wrong? Do you have any references for reading material for me to deal with the 21 year old who thinks she’ s grown

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  9. Pingback: “Let Them Learn From Failure”: Does it Apply When Parenting Our Adult Kids? | CollegeDirection's Blog

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